What Does It Take to Move A Montain?

DSCF1665

“…if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.” (1 Corinthians 13:2/NIV).

Young Exman was living in a small cottage. He had spent there all of his life. He did not know any other place. He used to get water from the little brook nearby on one side of his home. He grew his vegetables himself and was tending sheep and a cow.

There was a mountain on the backside of his palace as he at times jokingly used to call his cottage. In his bible readings he came across a passage where he read something of moving a mountain.

For the first time in his life he began to dislike his own mountain. How much more pleasant could all of his life be if only this lofty hill was not there.

On the day after he took up the challenge. He took his gardening tools, namely a shovel and a spade and began digging. He used his wheelbarrow to carry away the earth and the stony material. This is how he spent all of his day, hoping to finish his job by sunset.

In the late evening he began to feel discouraged. He had been working hard, but looking at the mountain he still could not really make a difference.

As a rule he would not talk to strangers passing by. But this day as an elderly man came along and started asking him what he was doing. He began to lament the uselessness of his efforts.

The stranger really was a sage. He told young Exman: “Do not be that discouraged! Be confident, have faith! You just continue working as you did today. After ten years being at it you will be able to see considerable progress!”

An old lady was passing by next morning. She was not the kind of person Exman would usually talk to. Yet she found out what he was aiming at. She began magnifying any disadvantages a mountain on one side of the house might imply. This led Exman to set himself to hard work for years to come!

From this day on all his time was consumed by his new job. He hardly managed to care for his cow, his sheep and his vegetables. Five years went by and ten years. After fifteen years he began to see things clearly.

The old sage had proved right. He now saw considerable progress in his endeavours. Yet the old mountain had not disappeared completely. Amazingly several smaller mountains had sprung up wherever he used to take the earth and the rubble in his wheelbarrow.

He used to have one mountain in the back of his cottage. Now he was surrounded by the remainder of his mountain and several other hills.

His cow was getting old. His sheep apparently did not really appreciate the new hills. They did not like to move on these as the ground tended to sink in when stepping on. His small vegetable garden did not now get as much sun as it used to.

Then he thought of the words of the old lady who had magnified the disadvantages of the old mountain. Of course now he was concerned with the problems the remainder of the mountain and the new hills did cause. With a heavy heart he decided to move the hills back to the place of the old mountain. After some more years of hard work he died. – What shall we learn from this tale as to moving mountains, faith, love, and a worthwhile aim for our lives?

“…if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.” (1 Corinthians 13:2/NIV).

Advertisements

About christenfindenruhe

Auf meinem deutschen Blog möchte ich kurze Texte über Matthäus 11 Verse 28 bis 30 veröffentlichen und die frohe Botschaft von Jesus Christus anschaulich machen. Es lohnt sich, Jesus Christus zu vertrauen. On my new English blog "Motivation of Christian Love" I am sharing my thoughts on 1 Corinthians 13 and other bible texts.
This entry was posted in 1 Corinthians 13:2 and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s